Website of Daniel A. Mayer

Dissertation

Design and Implementation of Efficient Privacy-Preserving and Unbiased Reconciliation Protocols

Author

Daniel A. Mayer

University

Stevens Institute of Technology

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Computer Science

Committee

Susanne Wetzel (Chairman), Robert Gilman, Ulrike Meyer, Antonio Nicolosi, Wendy (Hui) Wang

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BibTeX

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@phdthesis {dissertation,
  title = {Design and Implementation of Efficient Privacy-Preserving and Unbiased Reconciliation Protocols},
  year = {2012},
  pages = {321},
  school = {Stevens Institute of Technology},
  type = {Ph.D.},
  address = {Hoboken, NJ,
 abstract = {In recent years, our information and communication centric lifestyle
                gave rise to many novel applications in which the users often have to
                provide personal information. However, in general there is no
                transparency on why the data is needed,  where and how long it is
                stored,  and how it is shared with outside parties. In addition, when
                multiple users are involved, typically there is no guarantee that each
                user's input is taken into equal consideration. The central idea of the
                approach taken in this thesis is to enable networked,
                reconciliation-based applications in such a way that the infringement
                on the users' privacy is limited to what is absolutely necessary while
                guaranteeing unbiasedness at the same time.  This thesis makes multiple
                theoretical and experimental contributions to the field.

                The theoretical part builds upon secure multi-party computation
                protocols for Privacy-Preserving Reconciliation of Ordered Sets (PROS)
                which were proposed previously. The original protocols only provide
                security guarantees against weak, passive adversaries. In order to
                allow for applications that require stronger security guarantees such
                as, e.g., voting, as a first theoretical contribution we propose novel
                PROS protocols with security against stronger, malicious adversaries.
                In particular, we introduce and define the novel notion and a protocol
                for verifiable private equality testing which allows for the execution
                of an arbitrary number of secure equality tests on immutable sets of
                input values. Furthermore, the original protocols only operate on
                ordered sets of integers which limits their scope.  As a second
                theoretical contribution, we introduce privacy-preserving protocols for
                various interval operations which are geared to enable the construction
                of PROS protocols that operate on ordered sets of intervals.

                As part of the practical contribution, we developed a C++ library for
                privacy-preserving operations and protocols which includes
                implementations of all the protocols discussed in this thesis.  In
                order to allow for a proper experimental assessment of the protocols,
                we designed and implemented a novel test framework.  By leveraging the
                test framework, we performed rigorous and comprehensive performance
                evaluations for all proposed protocols and show that they are indeed
                practical for specific, real-world applications.},
 author = {Mayer, Daniel A.}
}